CGArtspace Gallery

Revisiting The Last Supper

Opening on Tues March 31' 2009 @7pm

Exhibition by 16 artists from Jakarta, Bandung, Yogya, Bali n Filipine

Artists: Pramuhendra, Yogie Ginanjar, Chandra Johan, Teguh Ostenrik, Ronald Manulang, Albert Yonathan, Kacrut, Beatrix H Kaswara, Indra Leonardi, Davy Linggar, Tisa Granicia, Hamdan Omar, Hanafi, Tommy Tanggara, Jay Ticar n Amy Aragon

Opened by: bpk Jeffrey Budiman, art lover n collector

  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
  • photo
Comment by Christiana Gouw on March 22, 2009 at 12:44pm
REVISITING THE LAST SUPPER
“Do this in remembrance of me" (Paul the Apostle, 1 Corinthians 11:23–26)

The works in this exhibition, REVISITING THE LAST SUPPER, are interpretations of the Last Supper made by artists by special invitation. There are three main areas involved in reinterpreting the Last Supper. The first is appropriation, or approaching the subject through image sources, from paintings of the Last Supper as it has been depicted or illustrated through the ages (see sample illustrations).
For example, take the masterpieces of the Renaissance painters of the 15th century, especially Leonardo Da Vinci, who reinterpreted the Last Supper in a way that was distinctive for his time. His mural in the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan is considered a very important work of wall painting because aside from being a work of great religious value to Christians, Leonardo's version of the Last Supper is seen historically (in the history of Western Art) as a work that embodies ideas and rules of perspective beyond the commonplace, a method of glorification or way of analyzing the scene in a dramatic, as well as mathematically precise, 360-degree panorama.
The approach of appropriation – through parody, malapropism, or pastiche; by borrowing signs, associating themes and styles of works produced by other artists, or being derivative; or by using forms of depiction that evoke meanings that diverge from the meanings of the original works – has become the fashion in contemporary art practice. This is because, using an image-based approach, artists tend to borrow or apply signs from images for entirely different and personal ends. Or they use the image as a vehicle or metaphor for raising some other critical issue, or to react or respond to the signs in the earlier work.

Second, there is interpretation of the biblical text. In interpreting scripture, the artist aims to create meaning in the context of religiosity. That is, what forms the basis for the creation of the work is instead the meaning of belief in the teachings of Christianity. Yet it is unquestionable that for the meaning of “ The Last Supper" to be understood outside of the religious context, textual studies can also be made to reinterpret it in historical terms, as an investigation of a significant narrative, a contemplation on the values it holds for humanity at large.

Third, there is the reinterpretation of “The Last Supper” based on the composite of image and text (the Bible). Here, artistic creation is based on both the imagery as well as its religious context. The bestselling and controversial novel, “The Da Vinci Code” by Dan Brown makes use of the biblical text and the history of art as references, such that the plot of the story purports to convey facts, which triggered reactions and sparked controversy in certain circles. The controversy over “ The Da Vinci Code” showed that The Last Supper, and Leonardo Da Vinci, at once, have turned into myth in the life of Western culture and the global era. Become an image of the tragedy of human history, along with its ambiguity.
Myth – at least according to the French master of semiology, Roland Barthes – comprising a kind of collective “representation,” naturalizes culture (history); myth today is more like “discourse” or “speech” than epic narrative. Thus, the exhibition, REVISITING THE LAST SUPPER also represents an attempt to approach the myths surrounding the context of “The Last Supper” today, through artistic interpretations by artists, involving their own personal points of view.

Of course, through these works, each maker and beholder holds his or her own sense of meaning and purpose; it is precisely this diversity that proves that artistic freedom, and freedom in methods of approach, can bring about new perspectives or different ways of seeing. And it is here, in fact, that the foundation for a wall to stem the flow of myths from the past is constructed.

Rifky Effendy

Comment

You need to be a member of CGArtspace Gallery to add comments!

Join CGArtspace Gallery

© 2017   Created by LAW©.   Powered by

Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service